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Feb 24, 2008

Traffic Accident

The number of traffic accidents is increasing in tandem with the increase of vehicles on the road every year. However, despite this relative rarity of accidents, the sheer number of vehicle movements along roads pushes up the accidents each year to an alarming figure.

Accidents occur randomly along most roads but statistics show they are less random along highway networks and are often clustered at certain stretches classified as hazardous locations or black spots.

Many factors accident happen in Malaysia. The Transport Minister Datuk Seri Chan Kong Choy should prove that he means what he says that traffic fines are not meant to generate income for the government but to deter motorists from breaking rules. If so then he should welcome the reduction by demanding that the reduced fines be made retrospective till January 2006 and refunds be given to those who had paid the higher rate ear lies.

Hardcore traffic offenders would think that there would be further relaxation of rules. Chan should not be surprised at the police’s actions as the Internal Security and Public Order Director Commissioner Datuk Mustafa Abdullah’s had said that they were not answerable to the ministry and had the powers to reduce traffic fines if necessary.

As fines for serious non-compoundable offences such as fatal accidents, drunk or dangerous driving and illegal racing remain unchanged, there is no reason for Chan to behave petulantly and pout just because he was not consulted. In the larger public interest he should demand instead that the police refund those who had paid earlier and therefore missed out on the lower traffic fines. And to improve road safety increase the list of non-compoundable offences especially those responsible for road accidents causing injury or death.

References on 25th February 2007 from:

  1. www.theborneopost.com/
  2. www.dapmalaysia.org/english/2006/sept06/

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